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"Time: Combat Through The Ages" ("time") (version "1.0")                    
Ancient Greece, but not for long. Written by Henry Ware, with help from Victor Mascari and Massimo Campostrini.
Notes to "time":
The basic idea here is that each city represents an era. Each era has its own set of units & is, in effect, a miniperiod. One of your original cities should build the more modern city & the others should build units for expansion & conquest. After the new city is completed, your older cities should be upgraded & the develop city should continue developing. Any neutral cities you capture will catch up to your current production level in a reasonable period of time.
When your country is larger, you should consider adding one or two additional development cities as a backup so you aren't excessively set back if you primary development center is captured or destroyed.
Generally more modern things have a significant advantage over older things, but even very old units can do sentry duty.
Any given unit represents a wide range of actual technologies. For example, infantry is every thing from muzzle loading guns to weapons with 50 times the range and exploding (heat seeking?) bullets.
Most of the subperiods have a trick in themselves. For example, the Napoleonic era is set up with an i>c>y>i, 'paper-scissors-rock', dynamic. That it is part of a larger period affects the balance: while cavalry might have an immediate advantage due to its speed, they become outdated more rapidly than the other two units.
With that said, I should also say that the play balance is not perfect. It is still, to a certain extent, a novelty period; but I think it is reasonably successful on that level.
There should be more notes, but this period needs a book :^)
Let me recast: there are no notes because, in simulation of real life, the interplay of future events is unclear until you experience them...

-- "stdterr"                    
      Standard set of terrain types shared by many game designs



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